Home-Activity #1: Kingdom of God Scriptural Passages

Below are a list of Scriptural Passages that help explain further Kingdom of God. It would be better if you already have an answer to the following questions so that when we discuss in class it will be more focused on clarifications. 

The Call Narratives

In reading the scriptural passages below, keep in mind the following passages:

1.) What were the disciples’ previous occupations? 
2.) How did they respond to Jesus’ call? 
3.) Why did they respond in that manner? 
4.) What made Jesus’ style of recruiting disciples different?

Calling of the Fishermen
Matthew 4:18 – 22; Mark 1:16 – 20; John 1:40-42; Luke 5:1-11 

Jesus Calls His First Disciples
Jesus calls Levi: Luke 5:27-32
Jesus calls the twelve: Matthew 10:2-4, Mark 3:14-19, Luke 6:12-16 
Jesus calls Philip and Nathanael: John 1:43-51 
Judas: John 12:4, 6
Thomas: John 20:26-28 

Jesus’ Words: The Parables

The Parable of the Mustard Seed (Mt 13:31-32) & The Parable of the Yeast (Mt 13:33 – 34)

  1. How do the Mustard Seed and Yeast describe the Kingdom of God?
  2. What kind of attitude do the parables promote?
  3. What message is this parable trying to tell us, the participants in the Kingdom of God?

The Parable of the Treasure (Mt. 13: 44) & The Parable of the Great Price (Mt 13: 45 – 46)

  1. What do the treasure and pearl in the parables symbolize?
  2. What kind of attitude does the parable promote?
  3. What message is this parable trying to tell us, the participants in the Kingdom of God?

 The Parable of the Pharisee and the Tax collector (Lk 18: 9 – 14)

  1. What were the attitudes that the Pharisee and Tax collector have?
  2. Why would Jesus condemn the Pharisee in the parable?
  3. How should our response to God be like in order for us to enter his Kingdom?

Access this link and answer the following questions:

  1. As you think of your own heart as Jesus’ new kingdom, are there any of these four areas (forgiveness, faith, humility, thankfulness) where you have not allowed Him to freely reign?
  2. Why do you think it’s hard for you to not surrender to Jesus in that area? 

Jesus’ Deeds: Miracles

Healing of two blind men (Mt 20:29-34), the blind Bartimaeus (Mk 10:46-52), the blind beggar (Lk 18:35-43)

  1. On a deeper level, what else could “blindness” mean?
  2. What were the characters “blinded” from?
  3. What did they do to show they had faith in Jesus?

The cleansing of a leper (Mt 8:1-4, Mk 1:4-45, Lk 5:12-16); and the cleansing of ten lepers (Lk 17:11-19).

  1. Aside from the physical illness, what social/spiritual “illness” was being healed?
  2. What did the lepers do to show they had faith in Jesus

The healing of a paralytic (Mt 9: 1-8, Lk 5:17-26)

  1. Aside from being physically immobile, what else could “being paralyzed” mean?
  2. What else could we be paralyzed from?

 

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Call of the First Disciples Narratives

As a group, answer the following guide questions by reading the prescribed scriptures below:

1.) What were the disciples’ previous occupations? 
2.) How did they respond to Jesus’ call? 
3.) Why did they respond in that manner? 
4.) What made Jesus’ style of recruiting disciples different?

Calling of the Fishermen
Matthew 4:18 – 22; Mark 1:16 – 20; John 1:40-42; Luke 5:1-11 

Jesus Calls His First Disciples

Luke 5:27-32 . . . Jesus calls Levi

Matthew 10:2-4, Mark 3:14-19, Luke 6:12-16 . . . Jesus calls the twelve

John 1:43-51 . . . Jesus calls Philip and Nathanael

John 12:4, 6 . . . Judas

John 20:26-28 . . . Thomas

Gospel Readings for the week (July 31 – August 3, 2012)

Hello Gents,

Here are the Gospel Readings for the Week. Kindly Follow the prescribed format:

1.) Sign of the Cross

2.) Prayer Leader: “The Gospel for the day is taken from the book of (i.e. John).
     Students: “Glory to you O, Lord.”
3.) After reading the verse, Prayer leader says, “The Gospel of the Lord.”
     Students: “Praise to you Lord Jesus Christ.”
4.) Reflection Prayer and then Reflection Question/s.
5.) Invocation of Saints
6.) Sign of the Cross
 
Gospel Readings: 
 
July 31, 2012
Mt 13:36 — 43
 
August 1, 2012
Mt. 13: 44 – 46
 
August 2, 2012
Mt 13: 47-53
 
August 3, 2012
Mt 13: 54 – 58

Catechism of the Catholic Church: Definition of the Kingdom of God

“The kingdom of God is at hand”

541 “Now after John was arrested, Jesus came into Galilee, preaching
the gospel of God, and saying: ‘The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom
of God is at hand: repent, and believe in the gospel.'”246 “To carry out
the will of the Father Christ inaugurated the kingdom of heaven on
earth.”247 Now the Father’s will is “to raise up men to share in his
own divine life”.248 He does this by gathering men around his Son
Jesus Christ. This gathering is the Church, “on earth the seed and
beginning of that kingdoms”.249

542 Christ stands at the heart of this gathering of men into the “family
of God”. By his word, through signs that manifest the reign of God,
and by sending out his disciples, Jesus calls all people to come together
around him. But above all in the great Paschal mystery – his death on
the cross and his Resurrection – he would accomplish the coming of his
kingdom. “and I, when I am lifted up from the earth, will draw all men
to myself.” Into this union with Christ all men are called.250
The proclamation of the kingdom of God

543 Everyone is called to enter the kingdom. First announced to the
children of Israel, this messianic kingdom is intended to accept men of
all nations.251 To enter it, one must first accept Jesus’ word:
The word of the Lord is compared to a seed which is sown in a field;
those who hear it with faith and are numbered among the little flock of
Christ have truly received the kingdom. Then, by its own power, the
seed sprouts and grows until the harvest.252

544 The kingdom belongs to the poor and lowly, which means those
who have accepted it with humble hearts. Jesus is sent to “preach good
news to the poor”;253 he declares them blessed, for “theirs is the
kingdom of heaven.”254 To them – the “little ones” the Father is
pleased to reveal what remains hidden from the wise and the
learned.255 Jesus shares the life of the poor, from the cradle to the
cross; he experiences hunger, thirst and privation.256 Jesus identifies
himself with the poor of every kind and makes active love toward them
the condition for entering his kingdom.257

545 Jesus invites sinners to the table of the kingdom: “I came not to
call the righteous, but sinners.”258 He invites them to that conversion
without which one cannot enter the kingdom, but shows them in word
and deed his Father’s boundless mercy for them and the vast “joy in
heaven over one sinner who repents”.259 The supreme proof of his
love will be the sacrifice of his own life “for the forgiveness of sins”.260

546 Jesus’ invitation to enter his kingdom comes in the form of
parables, a characteristic feature of his teaching.261 Through his
parables he invites people to the feast of the kingdom, but he also asks
for a radical choice: to gain the kingdom, one must give everything.262
Words are not enough, deeds are required.263 The parables are like
mirrors for man: will he be hard soil or good earth for the word?264
What use has he made of the talents he has received?265 Jesus and the
presence of the kingdom in this world are secretly at the heart of the
parables. One must enter the kingdom, that is, become a disciple of
Christ, in order to “know the secrets of the kingdom of heaven”.266
For those who stay “outside”, everything remains enigmatic.267

The signs of the kingdom of God

547 Jesus accompanies his words with many “mighty works and
wonders and signs”, which manifest that the kingdom is present in him
and attest that he was the promised Messiah.268

548 The signs worked by Jesus attest that the Father has sent him.
They invite belief in him.269 To those who turn to him in faith, he
grants what they ask.270 So miracles strengthen faith in the One who
does his Father’s works; they bear witness that he is the Son of
God.271 But his miracles can also be occasions for “offence”;272 they
are not intended to satisfy people’s curiosity or desire for magic
Despite his evident miracles some people reject Jesus; he is even
accused of acting by the power of demons.273

549 By freeing some individuals from the earthly evils of hunger,
injustice, illness and death,274 Jesus performed messianic signs.
Nevertheless he did not come to abolish all evils here below,275 but to
free men from the gravest slavery, sin, which thwarts them in their
vocation as God’s sons and causes all forms of human bondage.276

550 The coming of God’s kingdom means the defeat of Satan’s: “If it is
by the Spirit of God that I cast out demons, then the kingdom of God
has come upon you.”277 Jesus’ exorcisms free some individuals from
the domination of demons. They anticipate Jesus’ great victory over
“the ruler of this world”.278 The kingdom of God will be definitively
established through Christ’s cross: “God reigned from the wood.”279

“The keys of the kingdom”

551 From the beginning of his public life Jesus chose certain men,
twelve in number, to be with him and to participate in his mission.280
He gives the Twelve a share in his authority and ‘sent them out to
preach the kingdom of God and to heal.”281 They remain associated
for ever with Christ’s kingdom, for through them he directs the
Church:
As my Father appointed a kingdom for me, so do I appoint for you that
you may eat and drink at my table in my kingdom, and sit on thrones
judging the twelve tribes of Israel.282

552 Simon Peter holds the first place in the college of the Twelve;283
Jesus entrusted a unique mission to him. Through a revelation from the
Father, Peter had confessed: “You are the Christ, the Son of the living
God.” Our Lord then declared to him: “You are Peter, and on this rock
I will build my Church, and the gates of Hades will not prevail against
it.”284 Christ, the “living Stone”,285 thus assures his Church, built on
Peter, of victory over the powers of death. Because of the faith he
confessed Peter will remain the unshakeable rock of the Church. His
mission will be to keep this faith from every lapse and to strengthen his
brothers in it.286

553 Jesus entrusted a specific authority to Peter: “I will give you the
keys of the kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind on earth shall
be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in
heaven.”287 The “power of the keys” designates authority to govern the
house of God, which is the Church. Jesus, the Good Shepherd,
confirmed this mandate after his Resurrection: “Feed my sheep.”288
The power to “bind and loose” connotes the authority to absolve sins,
to pronounce doctrinal judgements, and to make disciplinary decisions
in the Church. Jesus entrusted this authority to the Church through
the ministry of the apostles289 and in particular through the ministry

Catechism of the Filipino Catholic: Definition of the Kingdom of God

481. The teaching and preaching of Jesus centered on the “Kingdom of God,” a dynamic symbol of
God’s active presence among His people. For Christ, this Kingdom, was grounded in the Old
Testament hope for Yahweh’s presence (cf. Ps 91:1, 96:10; 97:1; 99:1 etc). This hope was
eschatological, that is, something already present but not yet fully (cf. Mk 1:14f; Mt 4:17). Without
ever defining precisely what the Kingdom of God is, Jesus uses it to embrace all the blessings of
salvation, a salvation of God’s active presence within people’s daily life, liberating them from the
enslaving power of evil, for loving service of their fellowmen.

For Filipino Christians today, PCP II sketches the essentials of the Kingdom as a “gift of God,”
made present in Jesus, as a “Task” and as a “Promise” (cf. PCP II 39-43).

482. Christ’s typical method of communicating his word about the Kingdom was by telling stories,
parables. In them he focused on the common life of his listeners, and drew them into recognizing
God’s presence therein. Jesus taught the people that God was their Father, not in competition with them.
That He was not calling them out of their own humanity, but rather making their own creative human efforts
possible by His divine presence.

483. Another characteristic of Jesus’ preaching was his peculiar use

of “Amen.” While “Amen” was customary in responding to another’s assertion, Jesus used it rather to
introduce his own message. Jesus’ Amen expressed a unique blend of certainty, authority and power.
Certainty, because Jesus claimed to be expressing only what he hears from the
Father. “I do nothing by myself. I say only what the Father has taught me” (Jn 8:26-28).
Authority, because unlike the prophets of old, Jesus spoke in his own name: “I solemnly assure
you . . .” (cf. Jn 3:3,11; 5:19,24, etc.) Jesus puts his word above Moses and the Law. “You have heard
the commandment imposed on your forefathers . . . What I say to you is. . .” (Mt 5:21-48).
Power, because Jesus claimed a unique filial relationship with God his “Abba,” Father. And he
claimed the power to share this relationship with others:

“Everything has been given over to me by my Father. No one knows the Son but the Father, and no one
knows the Father but the Son, and anyone to whom the Son wishes to reveal Him” (Mt 11:27).

Deeds

484. Peter’s Pentecost discourse began with: “Men of Israel, listen to me! Jesus the Nazorean was a
man whom God sent to you with miracles, wonders, and signs as his credentials. These God worked
through him in your midst, as you well know” (Acts 2:22). But Jesus was not the typical “wonderworker”
creating a big show to draw crowds of followers. Rather he worked a healing ministry which
constantly called to personal faith and discipleship (cf. PCP II 84).

485. The direct connection between faith and healing works is clearly affirmed by Christ in many of
his signs. For instance:
• when he cured the paralytic (cf. Mk 2:1-12), and the woman with the issue of blood (cf. Mk
5:25-34);
• when he gave sight to the blind Bartimaeus (cf. Mk 10:46-52), and restored to life Jairus’ daughter (cf. Mk
5:21-24,35-43);
• when he cured the centurion’s servant boy at Capernaum (cf. Mt 8:5-13), and the daughter
of the persistent Canaanite woman (cf. Mt 15:21-28);
• when he cleansed the ten lepers, of whom only the one Samaritan returned to give thanks
(cf. Lk 17:11-19).

In all these cases, Christ’s message was the same: “Your faith has been your salvation. Go in
peace” (Lk 7:50). In contrast, in his own home town of Nazareth, Jesus could work no miracle, “so
much did their lack of faith distress him” (Mk 6:5-6).

486. The faith which Jesus praised throughout his ministry was not the self-righteous, legalistic faith
of the Scribes and Pharisees. Rather, for those who knew their own helplessness, it was the open
acceptance of God’s free gift of loving, healing presence among them in Christ. “Believing” meant
reaching out beyond themselves and their need to embrace the free gift of Christ’s life-giving and
healing love. This is the faith that “saves” because it shares in the very power of God, active within
our daily lives.

487. But beyond open acceptance, this faith which Jesus praises also involves discipleship: an
implicit commitment. Each is called to live out the gift of life freely given, in all the concrete
circumstances of one’s daily life, by following Jesus’ way. This is what coming to know Jesus Christ
demands of every believer. Each has a mission as Christ himself had, from the Father. To personally
know Christ, then, is to understand the meaning of one’s own concrete life in view of the larger
perspective of the Kingdom of God: of our graced union with God (cf. PCP II 62,67,79,85).

488. Besides his healing, Christ’s ministry was noted for his celebration of the Kingdom in tablefellowship.
He not only forgave sinners and associated with tax collectors and outcasts (cf. Mk 2:15-
17); he even scandalized his pious contemporaries by dining with them. Such table-fellowship
symbolized Christ’s whole mission and message of drawing all into his Father’s Kingdom. “I have
come to call sinners, not the self-righteous” (Mk 2:17). It prefigures the eternal banquet in the
Kingdom of God in which “many will come from the east and the west and will find a place, while the
natural heirs will be driven out into the dark” (Mt 8:11-12).

489. The importance of this table-fellowship in Jesus’ ministry is confirmed by two things. The first
is the special importance among the early disciples of the “breaking of bread” (Lk 24:35; Acts 2:46).
This must have come from Jesus’ own mannerism. The second is the Lord’s prayer which Christ
taught his disciples. It summarizes the ministry of Christ in terms of “Abba” (Father), the Kingdom,
bread, forgiveness and the final test. All of these refer in one way or another to table-fellowship and
more. Not just voluntary “coming together” but the koinonia, the transforming communion we have in
the Eucharistic celebration as members of Christ’s Body.

Saving from Socio-Political Oppression

496. The Exodus liberation of the Old Testament is the background for Jesus’ saving work as the
new Moses. He teaches a new hierarchy of values that undermined the oppressive social structures of
his day (cf. Lk 16:14-15). But how did Jesus actually liberate? First, he exposed the enslaving,
corrupting power of riches. Jesus showed that giving was better than taking, sharing more liberating
than hoarding (cf. Lk 6:29-30; 14:13-14; Acts 20:35).
For Jesus, the key to economic liberation was twofold: 1) to free human hearts from their greed
and self-seeking; and 2) to inspire them with respect for others, sensitivity and compassion for the
needy, and a generous, outgoing love for those in want.

497. Second, Jesus taught that any power not rooted in mutual service was enslaving and oppressive.
“Whoever wants to rank first among you must serve the needs of all” (Mk 10:42-45). Love is
ultimately the only power that sets people free.
Third, Jesus liberated his followers from the common social prejudices that bound them. These
were the customary ways of honoring the wise and the rich while discriminating against foreigners,
women, public sinners and outcasts. He taught concern for “the little ones” of the Kingdom (cf. Mt
18:10).

498. Finally, Jesus freed his contemporaries from mere external, lega1istic religious obedience to the
Law by interiorizing and prioritizing its obligations.
Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, you hypocrites! You pay tithes on mint and herbs and seeds, while
neglecting the weight, matters of the law: justice and mercy and good faith. It is these you should have
practiced, without neglecting the others. Blind guides, you strain out the gnat and swallow the camel! (Mt
23:23f)

Saving from Life’s Meaninglessness

499. Christ saved by being the revelation of the Father. To his followers Jesus promised: “If you
live according to my teaching, you are truly my disciples; then you will know the truth, and the truth
will set you free” (Jn 8:31f). His teachings set us free because they offer meaning and purpose in life,
dispelling the darkness of ignorance and despair. Jesus taught: “I am the light of the world. No
follower of mine shall ever walk in darkness; no, he shall posses the light of life” (Jn 8:12). “I have
come into the world as its light, to keep anyone who believes in me from remaining in the dark” (Jn
12:46).

CCC Kingdom of God Teachings

Below are the official teachings of the Church about the Kingdom of God. While reading, try answering the set of questions:

a.) Who was the intended audience of the Kingdom of God?
b.) In what forms did Jesus’ message of the Kingdom of God come in?
c.) What was Jesus freeing us from?
d.) What was the requirement that needed to be fulfilled in order to enter and participate in the Kingdom of God?

Indicate in the subject box your names.

CCC (541-550)

“The kingdom of God is at hand”

541 “Now after John was arrested, Jesus came into Galilee, preaching the gospel of God, and saying: ‘The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand: repent, and believe in the gospel.'”246 “To carry out the will of the Father Christ inaugurated the kingdom of heaven on earth.”247 Now the Father’s will is “to raise up men to share in his own divine life”.248 He does this by gathering men around his Son Jesus Christ. This gathering is the Church, “on earth the seed and beginning of that kingdom”.249

542 Christ stands at the heart of this gathering of men into the “family of God”. By his word, through signs that manifest the reign of God, and by sending out his disciples, Jesus calls all people to come together around him. But above all in the great Paschal mystery – his death on the cross and his Resurrection – he would accomplish the coming of his kingdom. “And I, when I am lifted up from the earth, will draw all men to myself.” Into this union with Christ all men are called.250

The proclamation of the kingdom of God

543 Everyone is called to enter the kingdom. First announced to the children of Israel, this messianic kingdom is intended to accept men of all nations.251 To enter it, one must first accept Jesus’ word:
The word of the Lord is compared to a seed which is sown in a field; those who hear it with faith and are numbered among the little flock of Christ have truly received the kingdom. Then, by its own power, the seed sprouts and grows until the harvest.252
544 The kingdom belongs to the poor and lowly, which means those who have accepted it with humble hearts. Jesus is sent to “preach good news to the poor”;253 he declares them blessed, for “theirs is the kingdom of heaven.”254 To them – the “little ones” the Father is pleased to reveal what remains hidden from the wise and the learned.255 Jesus shares the life of the poor, from the cradle to the cross; he experiences hunger, thirst and privation.256 Jesus identifies himself with the poor of every kind and makes active love toward them the condition for entering his kingdom.257

545 Jesus invites sinners to the table of the kingdom: “I came not to call the righteous, but sinners.”258 He invites them to that conversion without which one cannot enter the kingdom, but shows them in word and deed his Father’s boundless mercy for them and the vast “joy in heaven over one sinner who repents”.259 The supreme proof of his love will be the sacrifice of his own life “for the forgiveness of sins”.260

546 Jesus’ invitation to enter his kingdom comes in the form of parables, a characteristic feature of his teaching.261 Through his parables he invites people to the feast of the kingdom, but he also asks for a radical choice: to gain the kingdom, one must give everything.262 Words are not enough, deeds are required.263 The parables are like mirrors for man: will he be hard soil or good earth for the word?264 What use has he made of the talents he has received?265 Jesus and the presence of the kingdom in this world are secretly at the heart of the parables. One must enter the kingdom, that is, become a disciple of Christ, in order to “know the secrets of the kingdom of heaven”.266 For those who stay “outside”, everything remains enigmatic.267

The signs of the kingdom of God

547 Jesus accompanies his words with many “mighty works and wonders and signs”, which manifest that the kingdom is present in him and attest that he was the promised Messiah.268

548 The signs worked by Jesus attest that the Father has sent him. They invite belief in him.269 To those who turn to him in faith, he grants what they ask.270 So miracles strengthen faith in the One who does his Father’s works; they bear witness that he is the Son of God.271 But his miracles can also be occasions for “offense”;272 they are not intended to satisfy people’s curiosity or desire for magic. Despite his evident miracles some people reject Jesus; he is even accused of acting by the power of demons.273

549 By freeing some individuals from the earthly evils of hunger, injustice, illness and death,274 Jesus performed messianic signs. Nevertheless he did not come to abolish all evils here below,275 but to free men from the gravest slavery, sin, which thwarts them in their vocation as God’s sons and causes all forms of human bondage.276

550 The coming of God’s kingdom means the defeat of Satan’s: “If it is by the Spirit of God that I cast out demons, then the kingdom of God has come upon you.”277 Jesus’ exorcisms free some individuals from the domination of demons. They anticipate Jesus’ great victory over “the ruler of this world”.278 The kingdom of God will be definitively established through Christ’s cross: “God reigned from the wood.”279

A Portrait of Jesus’ World

This activity was designed to help you build a more detailed picture of the Jesus’ world. Consider the following questions posed below while you read through the website links provided.

1.) What were the roles of the Pharisees and Sadduccees and how did they differ from each other?

2.) Why did the Pharisees and Sadduccees often ran in conflict with Jesus?

3.) Why was there a gulf between the Elite Class and the peasant class?

4.) How do you think did the purity system shape Jesus’ teachings and deeds?

5.) What are the similarities between Jesus’ world and our world?

Click on the following links for the readings.

http://www.aportraitofjesus.org/social.shtml

http://dlibrary.acu.edu.au/staffhome/gehall/xtology2.htm

General Comments and Feedback Regarding the LT

Hello Gentlemen,

I’ve been checking a number of papers already and I’m seeing a pattern of answering that I want to correct: Remember: Long Tests are OBJECTIVE even if they are in ESSAY form. The reason why we opted to use the Essay form is to gauge not only your recall (the objective facts) but your understanding as well (how you connect the facts together). Thus, when we give an essay test, it doesn’t automatically mean that we’re measuring your OPINION–that’s what REFLECTION PAPERS are for.

Most of the answers I’m getting are coming from your “stock knowledge” and not from the lessons we discussed. The questions are designed the extract what you know from the lesson and not just what you remember from previous school years. For example, in answering the question, “What does the Incarnation reveal about who God is?” I was expecting an answer to similar to “God is a God of History. He has been involved in human history and activities. His presence is fully revealed in Jesus Christ.” But I’m getting answers that say, “God is merciful, God is Love, God is always present.” These are answers are generally correct but I was asking for what we RECENTLY discussed. I want to read the WORDS and CONCEPTS I was flashing on your screens. 

Also, I want you, gentlemen, to avoid saying, “And this is why I disagree with the statement” just for the sake of extending the number of lines for your answers. You don’t need to say this separately if it has been discussed clearly already.

Lastly, always remember that although CLE does talk about Faith and God, it is still an ACADEMIC subject with FACTS and OTHER INFORMATION to remember and understand. 

I hope this helps in your succeeding assessments.

Gospel Readings for the Week (July 23 – 27)

Hello Gents,

Here are the Gospel Readings for the Week. Kindly Follow the prescribed format:

1.) Sign of the Cross

2.) Prayer Leader: “The Gospel for the day is taken from the book of (i.e. John).
     Students: “Glory to you O, Lord.”
3.) After reading the verse, Prayer leader says, “The Gospel of the Lord.”
     Students: “Praise to you Lord Jesus Christ.”
4.) Reflection Prayer and then Reflection Question/s.
5.) Invocation of Saints
6.) Sign of the Cross
 
Gospel Readings: 
 
July 23, 2012
Mt 12: 38-42
 
July 24, 2012
Mt. 12: 46 – 52
 
July 25, 2012
Mt 20: 20-28
 
July 26, 2012
Mt 13: 10 – 17
 
July 27, 2012
Mt 13: 18 – 23